Stress lass nach!

3. Dezember 2013

3. Teil: The key is to do less

Questioning. This tool isn't about asking other people questions, it's about questioning the thoughts your mind creates. Just because your mind creates a thought doesn't make it true. Bill got in the habit of asking himself "Is that thought true?" And if he wasn't absolutely certain it was, he just let it go. He said: "Thank your mind for coming up with the thought and move on. I found this liberating because it gave me an outlet for negative thoughts, a relief valve I didn't have before." The technique of questioning your thoughts has been popularized by Byron Katie who advocates what she calls "the great undoing." Her experience and research show there is power in acknowledging rather than repressing negative thoughts. Instead of trying to ignore something we believe to be true, questioning allows us to see our thoughts "face to face" and to discredit them because they are untrue.

Purpose. Bill committed to living with purpose. Not so much a Life's Purpose - it was easier than that. He committed to purposefully doing whatever he was doing. To be doing it and only it. If he decided to watch TV he really watched it. If he was having a meal he took the time to enjoy the meal. There is research to support Bill's experience. In "A Pace Not Dictated by Electrons: An Empirical Study of Work Without Email" Gloria Mark and Armand Cardello cite evidence to suggest knowledge workers check email as much as 36 times an hour. The result is increased stress. Giving each activity your undivided attention ensures you're in the moment and fully living that experience.

An important key for Bill in all of this was starting small-very small. It's important because you can't take on stress in a stressful way. Often we try to bring about change through sheer effort and we put all of our energy into a new initiative. But you can't beat stress using the same techniques that created the stress in the first place.

Instead, the key is to do less than you feel you want to. If you feel like breathing for two minutes, do it for just one minute. If you are up for a day of really listening to people deeply, do it for the next meeting only. Leave yourself eager to try it again. What you want is to develop a sustainable habit: a stress-free approach to reducing your stress.


Greg McKeown is the author of Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less (Crown Business, Spring 2014). He advises leaders in Silicon Valley and speaks around the world. He is a Young Global Leader for the World Economic Forum and did his graduate work at Stanford. Connect with him @GregoryMcKeown.

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